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po-kenneth-kaner-2662-75
Name: Kaner, Kenneth G.
Star: 2662
Memorial Panel #: #PANEL#
Rank: Patrolman
District / Unit: 007
End of Watch: 19 June 1970
Incident Details: Police Officer Kenneth Kaner, 33, was a 9-year veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Englewood Station.

On June 19, 1970, Officer Kaner was sitting in his police car at the corner of 74th Street and Union Avenue. At approximately, 1:25 A.M., a group of five males – Bruce Sharp, Bradley Green, William Redwine, Dwight Cavin, and Jeremy Amos – were joyriding spotted the officer. They pulled the vehicle over and approached Officer Kaner’s squad car. Bruce Sharp was holding a sawed-off shotgun and William Redwine was armed with a .38-caliber Smith and Wesson gun. When Officer Kaner lifted his head-up from the police report he was writing he saw Redwine at his front passenger window and Sharp standing next to his window pointing the sawed-off shotgun. According to Sharp’s testimony he said, “Hi, Officer” and shot Officer Kaner in the head. The five men fled the scene and were pulled-over within minutes.

The murder weapon and Officer Kaner’s service weapon was found in the getaway car. Officer Kaner died en route to St. Bernard Hospital. Bruce Sharp, 24, pleaded guilty and was sentenced to serve 30 to 125 years in prison.

Sharp is a “C class” prisoner and goes before the Illinois Prisoner Review Board every three years. His next hearing is in 2016. Bradley Green and William T. Redwine were found guilty of murder, armed robbery, and the unlawful use of a weapon. Dwight Cavin was found guilty. Jerome Amos was found innocent. Green, Redwine, and Cavin have since been released from prison.

Officer Kaner’s funeral mass was held at St. Turibius Catholic Church and he was laid to rest in St. Mary Cemetery. He is survived by his wife, Pauline; and children, Kimberly and Kurt (CPD).

On Thursday, December 15, 2016, the Chicago Police Memorial Foundation chartered a bus and traveled with 25 uniformed Chicago police officers to the Illinois State Capitol Building in Springfield to protest the release of inmate Sharp. The inmate’s request for parole was denied by a vote of 12-1.

2 Comments

  • I worked with Ken in the 1960’s – he was a good man and a great police officer, who was brutally killed for no apparent reason. God rest his soul. — Dr. David Plebanski 07/31/08

  • RIP BROTHER

We Will Never Forget