Patrolman James Edward O’Connell  | Star #9524

Patrolman James Edward O’Connell | Star #9524

Patrolman James Edward O’Connell | Star #9524

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Patrolman James Edward O’Connell, Star #9524, aged 46 years, was a 22 year, 0 month, 4 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 19th District – Belmont.

On January 21, 1978, at 3:00 a.m., Officer O’Connell was working the first watch with his partner, Patrolman James Lucchesi, on beat 1973. The officers were assigned by the Communications Operations Section (COS) to handle a “Disturbance on the Street” with three men at Roscoe Street and Wolcott Avenue. Upon arrival the officers observed two men scuffling on the street trying to hold Butch Holzner, age 23, of 3201 North Clark Street, down. The men were trying to prevent him from driving as he was intoxicated. The officers tried to calm the situation but Holzner began to fight with them. Holzner struck Officer O’Connell in the chest two to three times. After several minutes of struggling with Holzner the officers were able to gain control and place him in cuffs. Holzner was arrested for Disorderly Conduct and transported to the 19th District for processing. After turning him over to lockup Officer O’Connell’s partner noticed he was pale and perspiring profusely. Officer O’Connell also told his partner that he had discomfort in his left shoulder. Thinking nothing of it, the officers’ cleared their assignment and shortly thereafter received another assignment from COS. They were assigned to a prisoner transport at 1911 West Melrose Street for beat 1933. Upon arrival they loaded two brothers, James E. Forsyth, age 20 and Wayne S. Forsyth, age 19, both of 1911 West Melrose into their squadrol. The arrestees, still unruly after fighting with the arresting officers, required a minimum use of force to get them into the squadrol. After transporting the two to the 19th District Officer Lucchesi noticed that his partner was still pale and now having shortness of breath. He asked him if he was okay, and he replied, “I’ll be alright.” Officer Lucchesi, concerned for his partners health, drove to Illinois Masonic Medical Center where Officer O’Connor entered the ER for help. Officer Lucchesi then notified their Supervisor, beat 1940, Sergeant Mead.

Officer O’Connell was examined and it was learned through tests that he needed a quadruple bypass surgery but was in too fragile a state to have it at that time. Officer O’Connell’s surgery was postponed and scheduled for a later date. On May 20, 1978, Officer O’Connell underwent the surgery, but due to complications he died shortly after the surgery began. He was pronounced dead at 10:28 a.m. on May 20, 1978. His death was determined to be caused from cardio-respiratory arrest due to severe coronary artery disease and mitral regurgitation.

Following Officer O’Connell’s death the Police Department ruled that his death was not a result of Performance of Duty. However, on September 22, 1978, the Chicago Policeman’s Annuity and Benefit Fund ruled that Officer O’Connell died in the line of duty. On October 2, 1978, The Director of Public & Internal Information Division, Tina Vicini, was directed by Superintendent James E. O’Grady to respond to Mrs. O’Connell’s attorney. The letter clarified the Department’s decision and informed the attorney that the Department’s previous determination would be upheld.

Officer O’Connell was waked at Thomas J. Cooney Funeral Home located at 3552 North Southport Avenue. He was laid to rest on May 23, 1978 in St. Adalbert Catholic Cemetery, 6800 North Milwaukee Avenue, Niles, Illinois.

Patrolman James Edward O’Connell, born May 8, 1932, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on May 16, 1956.

Officer O’Connell served in the Armed Forces, was a veteran of the Korean War and was Honorably Discharged. He was also a member of the Chicago Police Officers Local 1975, Diversey Post No. 869 American Legion and the St. Jude Police League. Officer O’Connell was survived by his wife, Catherine (nee Kinane), age 43; children: Kathleen, age 16 and Kevin, age 20; parents: Alma (nee Nichols) and Daniel and siblings: Daniel, Shirley and Steve.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #Z023558 Damage to Property Report.

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Constable James  Quinn  | Star #Unknown

Constable James Quinn | Star #Unknown

Constable James Quinn | Star #Unknown

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Constable of Police James Quinn, Star # Unknown, aged 39 years, was a 9 month, 4 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, elected to the Town of Chicago – 9th Ward.

On December 5, 1853, Constable Quinn succumbed to injuries sustained during two previous incidents in which he was attacked and severely beaten while in the discharge of his duties. The first attack occurred on Friday night, December 2, 1853, after Quinn, armed with a warrant, had arrested a man, Paul Parmilee, for theft in a notorious criminal hideout known as “The Sands“ a shantytown of brothels and saloons north of the Chicago River and east of present day Michigan Avenue. Quinn was escorting Parmilee to the Watch House when he asked Quinn if he could return to the place in the Sands in which he had been arrested to fetch his coat. As the Constable walked Parmilee back inside, ostensibly to get his coat, the establishment’s owner, William Rees, a notoriously violent man, attacked the Constable, breaking his ribs and injuring his jaw. During this altercation Parmilee escaped.

The following evening an arrest warrant was delivered to Constable Quinn ordering him to find and arrest the escapee. He returned to the Sands to conduct his search and again came upon Rees who had assaulted him the previous evening. Rees attacked Quinn, threw him to the ground and kicked him several times, fracturing additional ribs and puncturing the Constable’s lung.

Duty bound, and despite his injuries, Quinn reported back to the Watch House Sunday morning for the 5:00 a.m. end of watch roll call. Quinn briefed the Captain of the Night Watch who ordered his entire 26 men Night Watch to return to the Sands to search for and arrest both Parmilee and Rees. By mid-morning, both were in custody. Constable Quinn’s condition worsened throughout Sunday causing congestion of the brain. He succumbed to the injuries the following day, Monday, December 5, 1853.

On January 9, 1854, Rees was indicted by the Grand Jury for murder. On February 1, 1854, Rees was found guilty and sentenced to five years in in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Alton. On February 15, 1854, He began his sentence.

Constable Quinn’s funeral mass was held at Holy Name Church. He was laid to rest in the New Catholic Burial Ground, on Dearborn Street between North Avenue and Schiller Street. The cemetery was eventually closed and it is unknown if Constable Quinn’s remains were moved. The New Catholic Burial Ground was the direct predecessor of Calvary Cemetery and was located in the area presently bound by North Avenue, Burton Place, Dearborn Parkway and State Street directly west of the present residence of the Cardinal-Archbishop.

Constable of Police James Quinn, born in 1814, was elected on March 1, 1853. In 1853, the Constable served a dual role as Constable and police officer during the early stages of the Chicago Police Department.

Constable Quinn was survived by his wife, Margaret and son, Patrick. His son Patrick, known as Paddy, played major league baseball with the 1874 Chicago Champions of the Federal Club. He later played on Cap Anson’s Chicago White Stockings, the predecessor of the Chicago Cubs. Several of Constable Quinn’s grandsons James, Joseph and William served in the Chicago Fire Department. William J. O’Brien died in the line of duty on July 15, 1917 in a gas explosion. Another grandson, John J. O’Brien, became a Chicago Police Officer in 1901 rising to the rank of Captain before retiring in 1935.

On February 24, 1854, Margaret Quinn filed a petition with the Common Council for assistance because her husband “died while faithfully and honestly discharging his duty as an officer of the City of Chicago.” On March 6, 1854, the Council’s Committee on Judiciary issued a report concurring with Mrs. O’Brien’s petition and recommended a payment of $50.00. This marked the first time duty death benefits were awarded.

In 2007, a panel of seven professional historians from the Chicago History Museum reviewed all of the evidence in this case and unanimously found that Quinn “died as the result of injuries he suffered in the line of duty.“ These historians concluded, “We can say with certainty that Constable Quinn is the earliest known Chicago Police Officer to die in the line of duty.“

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

On March 2, 2010, Constable Quinn’s star was retired by Superintendent Jody P. Weis and enshrined in the Superintendent’s Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

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Constable James  Quinn  | Star #Unknown

Patrolman Christian Jacobs | Star #Unknown

Patrolman Christian Jacobs | Star #Unknown

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Patrolman Christian Jacobs, Star # Unknown, aged 37 years, was a 5 year veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 3rd Precinct – Webster Avenue Station.

On August 17, 1873, at approximately 4:00 a.m., Officer Jacobs was patrolling his beat when he came across and open door. The door of a saloon kept by Mr. Schnester located on the corner of Webster Avenue and Larrabee Street was open. As the officer proceeded to the saloon, he observed two men quickly emerge from the house. Officer Jacobs immediately rapped on the lamppost for assistance from the police station, which was a half a block away and from which he had reason to expect instantaneous aid. Without waiting for the arrival of backup, he ran across the street to seize the two men. The two men spotted Officer Jacobs and fled on foot, running down Lincoln Avenue towards Clark Street. At the same time a third man exited the house and seeing Officer Jacobs immediately drew a revolver and fired at him. The man then fled west on Webster Avenue, Officer Jacobs in pursuit. About one block west of Lincoln Avenue, the man turned and fired a second time at Officer Jacobs. The shot struck Officer Jacobs in the neck and he fell to the ground mortally wounded. He lay on the ground stunned and bleeding copiously for a few moments before he regained his energy and staggered over to the police station to report the occurrence. Sergeant Fox assigned all available men to search for the perpetrators. Officer Jacobs was taken to his residence at No. 203 Burling Street (present day 1968 North Burling Street). Doctors Allen, Miller and Williams and Professor Gunn of the Rush Medical College were summoned. They examined Officer Jacobs and determined that the bullet entered the anterior portion of the neck and glanced the right side of the neck and shoulder before lodging just over the shoulder blade. He lingered barely able to speak as he was coughing up large quantities of blood until succumbing to his injury at 5:00 p.m. on August 18, 1873.

The searching officers located one witness, an old market woman. She stated that she saw a man running barefoot west on Webster Avenue and then saw Officer Jacobs lying in the street. The only clew, a pair of ladies slippers, No. 6, were found in the vicinity proving the man the woman saw running was the murderer.

On November 25, 1873, Charles McLain, alias Brocky McLain, a noted burglar, was arrested for the murder of Officer Jacobs on a tip from a citizen. It is unknown whether McLain was prosecuted due to the lack of evidence.

Officer Huebner was waked at his residence located at No. 203 Burling Street (present day 1968 North Burling Street). He was laid to rest in Graceland Cemetery, 4001 North Clark Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Christian Jacobs, born in 1836, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department in 1868.

Officer Jacobs was a member of one or two German benevolent associations and the Police Protective Association. He was survived by his wife, Theodora and children: John, age 3, Lizzie, age 6, Mary, 9 and Rose, age 1.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

On May 24, 2005, Officer Jacobs’ star was retired by Superintendent Philip J. Cline and enshrined in the Superintendent’s Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

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Patrolman Patrick  O’Meara  | Star #94

Patrolman Patrick O’Meara | Star #94

Patrolman Patrick O’Meara | Star #94

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Patrolman Patrick O’Meara, Star #94, aged 38 years, was a 3 year veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 1st Precinct – South Branch Station.

On August 5, 1872, at 12:30 a.m., Officer O’Meara and his partner, Patrolman James Scanlon, were assigned to execute an arrest warrant for Christopher Rafferty who was wanted for battery. While canvassing the taverns in the neighborhood, they were able to locate Rafferty sitting inside O’Brien’s Saloon located at No. 1266 or 1466 South Halsted Street (present day 1266 or 1466 South Halsted Street) near Douglas Place (present day 35th Street). Officer O’Meara guarded the front door to prevent Rafferty’s escape, while Officer Scanlon served the warrant. Officer Scanlon approached Rafferty who was sitting at a table in the back of the room. As Scanlon approached Rafferty said to Officer O’Meara “will you have a cigar?“ At the same time Rafferty took one from his pant pocket. O’Meara replied that he did not wish one just then. Officer Scanlon then told Rafferty that he had a warrant for him. Rafferty asked, “What is it for?“ Scanlon replied “I don’t know“ and Rafferty then said “read it to me.“ Scanlon read the warrant to Rafferty and Rafferty then said, “Well, if I must go, I must. You will let me get my coat, won’t you?“ Scanlon replied “certainly“ and started toward the door. After advancing a few feet, Rafferty, pulled a large navy revolver from his bootleg, and aimed at Officer O’Meara. O’Meara, seeing this, said, “don’t shoot.“ But before O’Meara could get the words out, Rafferty had pulled the trigger and O’Meara fell to the floor shot in the left breast. Rafferty then turned towards Officer Scanlon and fired one shot at him. Scanlon was able to duck behind the end of the counter and the shot went through his coat. There were four other patrons in the tavern at the time of the shooting. Hearing the commotion the patrons jumped up and fled for the door to reach safety. Rafferty was knocked down to the floor, either by the patrons running out or he had fallen by himself. Officer Scanlon seeing Rafferty prostrate on the floor rushed him as Rafferty took aim again and attempted to fire as Officer Scanlon grabbed the gun. The bullet would have certainly struck Scanlon in the head as he was in close quarters with it as Rafferty pulled the trigger, but Scanlon’s little finger was in the way and the hammer struck it. The two men struggled on the floor and Officer Scanlon continually hit Rafferty in the head with his Billy club while holding Rafferty’s hand and gun down with his other hand. Rafferty was able to break free and fled out the front door of the tavern. Scanlon pursued, but as he exited the tavern he tripped over some beer kegs lying on the sidewalk and fell into a ditch. When Scanlon regained his foothold Rafferty had disappeared.

Officer Scanlon yelled for help the entire time he fought with Rafferty, but the tavern patrons just watched as they were of the same ilk as Rafferty. Scanlon went back into the tavern to find Officer O’Meara still clinging to life. A physician was summoned, but Officer O’Meara expired prior to his arrival. Officer O’Meara was removed to No. 98 Deering Street (present day 238 South Loomis Street) where he had resided with his wife and seven children.

On August 5, 1872, Detectives received a telegraphic notification from a well posted individual residing in a small town immediately outside the Southwestern city limits, informing them that Rafferty had passed through there on foot in the morning. Detectives Simmons and Elliot were instructed to take two men with them and board the $30.00 Joliet accommodation train. They selected Sergeant Fitzpatrick and Officer Mahoney from the Harrison Street Station. Ex-Superintendent Kennedy also accompanied the men. The men got off the train in Willow Springs and began their manhunt. The men split into three groups and Rafferty was located walking just off the main road by Office Mahoney and a hired wagon man. Rafferty was taken into custody and willingly got into the wagon and was transported back to the city.

On September 4, 1872, Christopher Rafferty was indicted by the Grand Jury for murder. At his arraignment, Rafferty pleaded not guilty and his attorney requested a change of venue, which was granted and moved to Lake County, Waukegan, Illinois. On September 10, 1872, Rafferty was found guilty of first-degree murder and recommended to hang until dead. On October 14, 1872, Rafferty was sentenced to hang on October 4, 1872 by Judge Tree. Rafferty appealed and was granted a second trial and was again convicted and sentenced to hang on March 7, 1873. Rafferty once again appealed to the Illinois Supreme court and was granted a third trial and was again convicted and sentenced to hang. On February 27, 1874, Rafferty was hanged for Patrolman O’Meara’s murder in Waukegan, Illinois.

Officer O’Meara was laid to rest in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois.

Patrolman Patrick O’Meara, born in 1834, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department in 1869.

Officer O’Meara was survived by his wife, Julia and children: James, age 3, John, age 11, Katherine, age 9, Thomas, age 4 and William, age 5.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

On December 18, 1957, Officer O’Meara’s star was retired by Commissioner Timothy J. O’Connor and enshrined in the Superintendent’s Honored Star Case, located in the 4th floor Office of the Superintendent at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. The Honored Star Case was later relocated to the lobby of Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer O’Meara’s Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

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Constable James  Quinn  | Star #Unknown

Probationary Patrolman Niels L. Hansen | Star #Unknown

Probationary Patrolman Niels L. Hansen | Star #Unknown

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Probationary Patrolman Niels L. Hansen, Star # Unknown, aged 27 years, was a 2 month veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 2nd Precinct – West Chicago Avenue Station.

On February 18, 1871, at 11:30 p.m., Officer Hansen was leaning against a building at the Northeast corner of Chicago Avenue and Noble Street conversing with Officer John Hanratty and a Milwaukee Avenue Car Conductor named Sohle. The two men were standing at a distance of about five feet from Officer Hansen. Hansen was talking about the coldness of the weather and suddenly the report of a pistol was heard quite close by to where the three men were standing. So close in fact, that the flash was observed by Officer Hanratty and Mr. Sohle. Officer Hansen then collapsed to the ground and the two men leaped forward and picked him up. Officer Hansen was dead. Officer Hanratty then ran to the Chicago Avenue Station and made report of the shooting. The news of the affair produced a most profound sensation in the station, and several officers ran to the spot, while others procured a wagon to bring the murdered officer to the station. Mr. Sohle was standing over him, a crowd of anxious citizens around him. He endeavored to staunch the blood that flowed in torrents from the nose and mouth of the dead officer. Their efforts were useless, he being beyond mortal aid. Officer Hansen was taken to the station and laid out upon the floor.

The eager inquiries of the bystanders could elicit no further information from Mr. Sohle than that he saw the flash of a pistol, heard the report then saw Hansen fall to the ground. Hanratty said that he felt certain that the ball was from Hansen’s own pistol, the sound appearing to come from under his clothes. That this is absurd needs no demonstration in the face of the assertions of both witnesses that they saw the flash of the pistol. The policemen then examined the clothing of Officer Hansen in order to find the weapon that it was supposed he carried, but none was found on him, or, as it was afterward ascertained near the scene of the tragedy.

The officer appeared reluctant to make examination of the body to discover where was the fatal wound, until the Coroner should have viewed the remains. Shortly after 1:00 a.m. the bother of the dead officer, Abraham Hansen, Star #111, who was also a policeman at the Union Street Station, in company with reporters, arrived at the station. An examination of the body showed conclusively that no wounds were to be found. The head was covered with blood, though there where the wound was situated could not be determined.

It was believed, later, that Officer Hanratty was reaching into his overcoat pocket and accidentally discharged his revolver. The shot struck Patrolman Hansen in the face, killing him instantly.

Officer John Hanratty denied that the shot was fired from his pistol. He was subsequently charged with murder for refusing to admit that it was an accident or to provide any information. A jury found him not guilty.

Officer Hansen’s resting place is unknown. His death record was destroyed in the Chicago Fire.

Patrolman Niels L. Hansen, born in 1844, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department in December, 1870.

Officer Hansen was survived by his wife, two infant daughters and brother, Abraham (CPD).

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

On March 2, 2010, Officer Hansen’s star was retired by Superintendent Jody P. Weis and enshrined in the Superintendent’s Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

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