July 2018

Chicago Police Memorial Foundation honors two Chicago police sergeants and five Chicago police officers as part of its Officer of the Month program

Chicago
This morning the Chicago Police Memorial Foundation honors two Chicago Police Sergeants and five Chicago Police Officers who helped save two women from a house fire. 

On May 9th, Chicago Police Officers from the 4th district were handling a domestic disturbance near 79th and Muskegon. While typically the Officers are called in to restore peace, sometimes the disturbance can turn ugly and violent. The wrong words or actions can easily send the situation into a dangerous place. That night, this domestic was one with two longtime partners who would not listen to the responding officers. A supervisor was called in to assist. Sergeant Scott Hall responded and even with additional resources, the disagreement raged on until the decision was made to arrest both partners.  By this time, additional Officers had responded to help out, including another supervisor, Sergeant Carlos Sanchez.  The offenders were placed in squads and all were ready to move to the next assignment when a man ran from his house directly across the street screaming that his wife and daughter were trapped in their home that was now on fire.

Without missing a beat, the officers moved from enforcers of peace to lifesavers. Officer Deonvelle Lamon kicked in the front door and Sergeants Hall and Sanchez went inside screaming for the women to follow their voices.  They searched for victims and heard a woman screaming behind a bedroom door. Sergeant Sanchez kicked at the door but it would not open. The dense smoke caused the officers to head outside to catch their breath and regroup.

Additional Officers responded and searched for another entrance to the house. Sergeant Hall and Officers headed to the rear of the building where Lamon kicked in the rear door. Officers Lyle Jandecek, Timothy Griffin and Robert Skrobot followed Hall and Lamon into the rear of the building. The smoke was so thick the Officers had to crawl on their hands and knees to search for the women. Miraculously, Lamon heard a voice and was able to pull the mother to safety.

Meanwhile, Sergeant Sanchez continued to try to bust down the bedroom door but the flames and smoke were intolerable causing them to retreat outside to regroup. They learned from the father that his daughter was wheelchair bound. The Sergeants returned into the burning building a third time to attempt to rescue the daughter. The daughter’s bedroom door was engulfed in flames and the officers continued to try to break it down; however, the deadly smoke overtook the Officers and Sergeants forcing them to again leave the building. Officer Yuan made a final attempt to rescue the daughter but he too was quickly overcome by the thick smoke and retreated outside.

At this point, the Chicago Fire Department arrived and the officers led them to where the daughter could be found. The Chicago Fire Department went in and rescued the daughter who was trapped in her bed. The ceiling had collapsed blocking the door which is why the Officers were not able to open it.

The mother and daughter were taken to the hospital. The mother survived, but sadly, weeks later, the daughter succumbed to her severe burns.

 

Sergeants Hall and Sanchez were transported by ambulance to the University of Chicago Hospital where Sergeant Sanchez was released after some medical treatment. Some of the other Officers were also treated by medical personnel and released; however, Sergeant Scott Hall was hospitalized and suffered permanent injuries to his respiratory system.

The officers that evening did what many police officers do on every watch in this city -- they come when people ask for help. When these officers and sergeants responded to a call of a domestic disturbance, they never imagined they would be risking their lives to save others in a house fire but it was what their job called for that night,” said Phil Cline, Executive Director of the Chicago Police Memorial Foundation.

Today, more than ever, their jobs are not easy ones. These Officers are called to make tough decisions, and on that morning, they worked as a team with one goal to save the mother and daughter. Doing so without concern for their own wellbeing.  It is our honor to award these heroes with our appreciation and we proudly make them our July Officers of the Month, presented by Galls.      

 

June 2018

Chicago
Today, the Chicago Police Memorial Foundation honors Retired Chicago Police Officer Robert Olson who served the city for 39 years and 11 months.  Officer Olson utilized his training and experience when confronted by an armed assailant who wanted his car. The carjacker, a repeat felon, was out on the street on early release from prison, having been previously convicted of a robbery and gun charge.

The carjacking occurred on April 25, 2018, a Wednesday evening when Robert had planned to join some friends at a local Bridgeport establishment for dinner. As he got close to the restaurant he looked for a place to park his car and found one near 29th and Shields.

Although Robert had been retired for over 6 years, his instincts and observational skills are still sharp. Robert noticed three young guys milling around the corner and pondered what they were planning. As Robert parked, he observed the three guys were gone and assumed they just went on their way. What Robert didn’t know is that this crew had crouched down behind a car, hiding so they could surprise Robert and catch him off guard. Robert got out of his car quickly slamming the door and was confronted by the felon who pointed the gun directly at him while running toward him, shouting “I’ll kill you, give me the car.”

Robert Olson retired honorably after nearly 40 years but the police tradition of service continues. Robert’s son, also named Robert Olsen is presently on the CPD working in the Detective division. Robert’s grandson is also named Robert Olson, but he chose another path, going to law school at the University of Illinois. What is interesting is that earlier this year, he also was a victim of carjacking. The young man was in Hyde Park when he was carjacked. The suspect pointed a gun, demanded the car and luckily, the youngest Robert Olsen was not hurt, but he did lose the car. After this robbery, Robert was concerned as these carjackings seemed to continue to increase citywide. 

Robert Olsen continues to carry a gun to protect his family and his life as most retired police officers do. On that evening when his life was threatened by the carjacker, he acted instinctively as police do. Robert shot the suspect once without hesitation and the felon fell to the ground. As the felon lay on the street, his accomplice asked Robert not to shoot him saying “Don’t shoot me, I don’t have a gun,” which implies he knew exactly what they were doing – working together as a crew out carjacking innocent people. Robert ordered the accomplice to the ground and called 911 while the third suspect took off running.  The police arrived; the shot felon was taken to the hospital where he was pronounced dead.  The police recovered the felon’s gun and arrested the accomplice. The third suspect was eventually arrested, but the States Attorney’s office chose not to charge either accomplice and both were released. Robert was told that the accomplices were not armed so they wouldn’t be charged.

“Over the last few months, we have honored a few Officers who have stopped carjackings from occurring. We are thankful for the police, both active and retired, that are constantly surveying their surroundings to ensure the safety of themselves and others,” said Phil Cline, Executive Director of the Chicago Police Memorial Foundation.

The felon in this case is suspected of other robberies after his early release, and the police believe he committed an earlier carjacking at about 8:00am on that fateful morning that he tried to rob Robert Olson. 

This morning we are happy to present this award to Robert Olson. Without his training and life experiences as a law enforcement officer, it could have gone the other way, and we would be mourning his loss.  Please join us in honoring retired Officer Robert Olson, as our June Officer of the Month presented by Galls.

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ABOUT THE CHICAGO POLICE MEMORIAL FOUNDATION

The Chicago Police Memorial Foundation is a not-for- profit organization dedicated to honoring the lives of our fallen heroes. The Foundation provides support and assistance to the families of Chicago Police Officers who were killed or catastrophically injured in the line of duty.

Established in 2004, the Foundation strengthens the relationship between the Chicago Police, its business and civic leaders, and its citizenry. It allows us to express our gratitude to the fallen Officers' families for the ultimate sacrifice of their loved one.  To date, the Foundation has donated more than $9.5 million to family members of Chicago Police officers in need of assistance. 

For more information about the Chicago Police Memorial Foundation and its mission, please visit our website at www.cpdmemorial.org

 

May 2018

Chicago –
The Chicago Police Memorial Foundation is proud to partner with Galls for our Officer of the Month Award. Galls services the needs of law enforcement, military, security, fire, ems, postal, public transportation and more! Galls also offers an extensive selection of products and brands, competitive prices, responsive service, fast deliveries, and seamless ordering. Galls is proud to serve America’s public safety professionals.

In 1962, President John F. Kennedy designated May 15 as Police Officers Memorial Day, and this week as Police Week in honor of those peace officers who, through their courageous deeds, have lost their lives or have become disabled in the performance of duty.  Today, the National Memorial Ceremony is taking place in Washington DC, on the grounds of our Capital, where Officer Bernard W. Domagala and Officer Andre Van Vegten are being honored along with hundreds of other Men and Woman in law enforcement who have made the ultimate sacrifice in 2017.

This morning, we honor four Sergeants and four Officers who took some courageous actions on a quiet Sunday morning last summer. On July 9, 2017, a woman walked into the 025th District station telling officers that her adult son was holding his wife and infant child against their will at gun point in their apartment on LeClaire near Diversey on Chicago’s Northwest side. Officer Luis Lopez and Officer Christian Nunez went to the apartment to try to free the woman and infant. The Officers were able to enter the apartment, safely evacuate the wife and child without incident, however, the offender refused to cooperate with Officers and a standoff ensued. Verbal negotiation was initiated through an open window and support units summoned while Sgt. Michael Keeney and Officer Luis Lopez attempted to talk the subject out of the apartment.  The suspect became volatile and refused to comply.  The SWAT Team was notified and while securing a perimeter, the offender emerged from the apartment brandishing a handgun and fired it at Officer Lopez. Sgt Keeney returned fire but it did not deter the offender who ran northbound to Diversey and turned east. Responding units pursued the offender who continued to disregard all commands to drop the weapon and surrender to police. Sgt. Sonia Rios was shot at when the offender emerged from a gangway.  The offender continued to flee, running through yards, jumping fences refusing all demands to stop and surrender. The offender attempted to hide in a basement stairwell and Officers Rodriguez, Hardt, and Seng all gave verbal direction to drop the gun. The offender emerged with his gun in hand pointing it at officers who fired their weapons at the offender who continued to attempt to flee running northbound in the gangway. Officers positioned at the end of the gangway returned fire ending the threat. The offender was placed into custody, his weapon was recovered and Chicago Fire Paramedics rendered aid; however, the offender ultimately succumbed to his wounds.

The actions of these Officers that day were heroic and a vivid example of how quickly things change in the life of an officer.

When they awoke that Sunday morning, not one of these Officers were looking forward to an exchange of gunfire with an offender who had held his own family hostage, and then escaped running through a quiet neighborhood shooting indiscriminately. These officers responded to a call for help and took actions to eliminate a threat before anyone else could be harmed. It is something they do every day,” said Phil Cline, Executive Director of the Chicago Police Memorial Foundation.

Because of their demonstration of professionalism and bravery, we are proud to honor Sergeants Michael Keeney, Scott Kravitz, Sonia Rios, Erik Seng and Officers Luis Lopez, Christian Nunez, Efrain Rodriguez, and David Hardt and designate them our May Officers of the month present by Galls.

ABOUT THE CHICAGO POLICE MEMORIAL FOUNDATION

The Chicago Police Memorial Foundation is a not-for- profit organization dedicated to honoring the lives of our fallen heroes. The Foundation provides support and assistance to the families of Chicago Police Officers who were killed or catastrophically injured in the line of duty.

Established in 2004, the Foundation strengthens the relationship between the Chicago Police, its business and civic leaders, and its citizenry. It allows us to express our gratitude to the fallen Officers' families for the ultimate sacrifice of their loved one.  To date, the Foundation has donated more than $9.5 million to family members of Chicago Police officers in need of assistance. 

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For more information about the Chicago Police Memorial Foundation and its mission, please visit our website at www.cpdmemorial.org

April 2018

Chicago
This morning, the Chicago Police Memorial Foundation honors two Chicago Police Officers for their bravery. On December 6th, 2017, around midnight, Officer Michael Fazy and his partner, Officer Brandon Kirby observed two suspects standing near a gas station at 95th and King Drive. It was near zero degrees that night and the officers, aware of numerous car jackings that had taken place in the area, thought they should question the subjects, finding out why they were standing out in the cold.  As they approached the subjects, one subject took off, and Officer Kirby followed him on foot while Officer Fazy followed in the squad car. Officer Kirby broadcast the direction of flight while Officer Fazy drove parallel to him in the car.

The subject crossed numerous streets, heading south, running through yards and jumping fences to escape the officers. Officer Fazy drove south to head him off, exited the car to stop the subject while ordering him to show his hands and stop. The subject turned and ran away, around a garage and into a yard where Officer Kirby saw a weapon in the suspects hand and watched as the subject raised the gun shoulder high and fire directly at him. Officer Kirby saw the muzzle flash and hit the ground to avoid the gunfire. Officer Kirby called in a 10-1, shots fired at the police and returned fire. The subject ran back toward Officer Fazy and fired at him, striking Officer Fazy in the hand and in the upper left shoulder area of his vest. The bullet was lodged in Officer Fazy’s vest. Although wounded, Officer Fazy returned fire at the subject who continued to flee.

Additional officers responded to the 10-1 and were able to capture the subject a short distance away from the encounter. The police recovered two guns, a glock .45 caliber semi-automatic handgun with an extended magazine and a revolver. The suspect was a felon with multiple convictions for UUW, theft, fleeing and eluding the police and Possession of a Controlled Substance.

This case reminds us the dangers faced everyday by the men and women who patrol our streets. Officer Kirby will never forget the muzzle flash he saw that morning and Officer Fazy recalls that when he was shot, all he could think about was not seeing his unborn child. We are happy to say that Officer Fazy was able to witness the birth of his firstborn son with his wife in January and his hand is recovering.

Phil Cline of the Chicago Police Memorial Foundation said: “We applaud Officers Fazy and Kirby for the bravery they put forth on December 6th. It was because of their hard work, that two more guns were removed from the street. We are glad to know they both returned home that night.”

For their valiant efforts that morning, we salute these two officers, and we are proud to make them our April Officers of the month.

ABOUT THE CHICAGO POLICE MEMORIAL FOUNDATION

The Chicago Police Memorial Foundation is a not-for- profit organization dedicated to honoring the lives of our fallen heroes. The Foundation provides support and assistance to the families of Chicago Police Officers who were killed or catastrophically injured in the line of duty.

 

Established in 2004, the Foundation strengthens the relationship between the Chicago Police, its business and civic leaders, and its citizenry. It allows us to express our gratitude to the fallen Officers' families for the ultimate sacrifice of their loved one.  To date, the Foundation has donated more than $9.3 million to family members of Chicago Police officers in need of assistance. 

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For more information about the Chicago Police Memorial Foundation and its mission, please visit our website at www.cpdmemorial.org

March 2018

Chicago –
This morning we honor Lieutenant John Garrido who has been with the Chicago Police Department for over 27 years and is presently assigned to the 016th district. For many years John passed a newsstand at the busy intersection of Foster, Milwaukee and Central, watching as it became more and more run down with every passing season. John decided to investigate, learn who it belonged to and the rest of the story behind this newsstand. John found it empty but filled with recent newspapers. He learned that the stand was utilized on Sunday mornings when Mr. Anthony Johnson used the stand to sell the Sunday papers to the community and passing drivers. The stand was an eyesore, needed a new roof, new door, replacement of rotted wood and had no insulation. John also learned Mr. Anthony Johnson was an Air Force Veteran who had fallen on hard times and was now homeless.

John decided to enlist the community to transform the stand to its former glory and in turn, give Mr. Johnson a warmer place to sell the papers during Chicago’s harsh winter months. John posted it on FaceBook and the community stepped up with donations to replace the roof, the sides, the door that wouldn’t lock and a Police Officer and artist, Peter Buck volunteered his talents to paint murals on each side depicting the community and the man selling the newspapers. Community Business people came out of the woodwork including Tony Marino of Marino Jeep who helped to buy Johnson all new winter attire to help him stay a little warmer during these brutal months. John also established a GoFundMe page with a goal to help Anthony get back on his feet.

That goal has raised over $7,500 to be used to help cover the cost of an apartment for Mr. Johnson.

Lieutenant Garrido is another example of the core of the Chicago Police Officers who take seriously the serve part of their oath “to serve and Protect.”

John serves his community volunteering his time on various councils and even helps out our four legged friends when he established the Garrido Stray Rescue Foundation – an organization that reunites lost dogs with their owners or finds new homes for the abused or abandoned. He has long been a supporter of the Chicago Police Memorial Foundation and produces the Battle of the Bands, an event that showcases bands made up of First Responders with proceeds donated to our foundation and Chicago Fire Department charities.

This morning we honor Lieutenant John Garrido as an example of community service and outreach to make our city just a little bit better, a Chicago Police Officer truly making a difference. It is with great pride that we call Lieutenant John Garrido, our March Officer of the Month.